Tag Archives: Database

@HrOUG_2015 in Rovinj, Croatia


In a hectic year it is good to attend and contribute to Oracle user group sessions. This adds an element of a ‘Working Holiday’ to someones schedule. I can promise you, the vacation isle of Rovinj is a perfect venue for this and especially since it is the last week of the opening of the Hotel for this season.
Of course you can find all information about contributing to these events right here!!

@HrOUG_2015, as the official twitter-account of the conference goes, brings just this!! Content combined with pleasure. Ranging from quality sessions by Rock star speakers to relaxation in the pool and late night party in “The Castle”.

Currently the biggest worry is rain… At least for the attendees. As always the (very) hard working organizers are doing their best to create a super experience for everyone attending the conference, and my personal biggest worry is that the participants will actually bring their laptop to the hands-on experience. Actually doing logical replication yourself is so much cooler than seeing it demonstrated. It will be an interesting experience anyhow.

This conference also led to another series of Oracle Hero’s I got to meet in person!

And as always there is really serious stuff going on as well. One of the main challenges or worries today is the developments surrounding Oracle Database Standard Edition Two, and the impact it brings for the development of the European market.
Eliminating this database version forces emerging projects to use the Oracle Cloud, as the super-sharp priced project startup version is no longer available. We had this with Standard Edition One. It also counters Oracles own statement, quite recently presented by Andrew Sutherland, of hybrid cloud functionality, since there is no “on-premise” equivalent for a small scale project anymore!
We are hoping for a good discussion on Friday during the Standard Edition Round Table version at HrOUG, co-hosted by Philippe Fierens, as this development is very heartfelt in Croatia as it is in many European countries.

If you want to read more about this years event in Croatia, please checkout the many tweets and facebook entries by @helifromfinland, @alexnuijten, @roelhartman (ps. Vote for Roel as member of the ODTUG board) and many more!!

Oh, and as far a basic life’s needs go… The Internet on the island is the best ever!!


dbms_redefinition houskeeping

dbms_redefinition actually is a nifty, but powerful little toolkit that let’s you change table-definitions without actually locking the table in such a manner that it would prevent regular operations from being interrupted.

You can read loads about it in the Oracle documentation or in the wealthy library by Mr. Tim Hall.

housekeepingOne thing I noticed, and which I want to share here has lots to do with the house keeping that is automatically done by dbms_redefinition. Actually it talks about some of the bits it didn’t brush up after itself.

dbms_redefinition works using triggers and materialized views to help switch from your current active production table, via a so-called interim table, back to your shiny new, redefined production table. You can follow this beautifully by querying the dba_segments view along the way.
For this it obviously creates this materialized view and the other required components and it removes them after you finish your redefinition-trip. After all that is done, you can just remove your interim table and be done with it.

At least, that is what happened in most of the cases and is what you would expect!

Though, in some cases… it proved impossible to drop the interim table. To me this was somewhat scary… did the redefinition not finish, or did it not finish correctly?

What happened?

There was this table that I redefined. It had referential integrity constraints (aka. foreign key constraints) pointing towards it. Of course dbms_redefinition neatly created version of these to the interim table to be sure nothing went wrong.build-in-flight

When finishing redefinition (with dbms_redefinition.finish_redef_table) most of the interim bits and pieces are cleared away and you just have to drop your interim table manually (okay, we can discuss if this actually would / could / should be automated, but let’s leave that).

But… when you are then manually dropping this interim table (in a busy production system, I tend to want to be careful and just issue ‘drop table int_<tablename>‘. That does not work. dbms_redefinition “forgets” to remove these referential integrity constraints in the other tables (which are neatly names tmp$$_<constraintname>).
This than means either issue ‘drop table int_<tablename> cascade constraints‘, which is more then the basic ‘drop table‘ or find these constraints and remove them manually first:

select 'alter table '||owner||'.'||table_name||' drop constraint '||constraint_name||';'
from dba_constraints dc
where constraint_type='R'
and r_constraint_name in
(
select constraint_name
from all_constraints
where table_name = 'INT_<tablename>'
);
alter table <schema>.<foreign table> drop constraint TMP$$_<constraint name>;

I guess, personally, I would like dbms_redefinition to do this for me…

It’s smart enough! it created them!

Just a quick and additional note, setting ddl_lock_timeout to 30 or 60 for your session can actually help and prevent a lot of non-sense on a busy system.

Hope this helps someone sometime 😉

Introducing FETCHER in a running replication process

This is no regular bit of work and it will probably (and hopefully) never hit you in a production setup…

The prerequisite is that you know how on-line data replication in general, and Dbvisit Replicate specifically, work.

The following case is true:
I had half of a replication pair running.
It means that the MINE process was running, converting REDO-log in PLOG-format. The APPLY process had not yet started because the target database was still being prepared.

dbvisit-replicate-logical-replication-made-easy-18-638-300x225The reason for this is that we needed to start converting redo-log information to PLOG information while we were setting up the target environment. The reason for that was that the setup (exporting source, copying dump to target and importing) was taking quite a bit of time, which would impact redo-log storage to heavily in this specific situation.

It was my suspicion that the MINE process was unable to get enough CPU-cycles from the production server to actually MINE more redo-log seconds than wall-clock seconds passed. In effect, for every second of redo-log information that was mined, between 1 and 6 seconds passed.

This means that the replication is lagging behind and will never be able to catch up.

To resolve this, the plan was to take the MINE process of the production server and placed on an extra server. On the production server, a process called FETCHER would be introduced. The task of this process is to act as a broker between the database and the MIN process, forwarding the requested on-line an archived redo log files.

Normally (!) you would use the nifty opportunities that Replicate offers with the setup wizard and just create a new setup. And actually, this is what I used to figure out this setup. And, if you can, please do use this…

Why didn’t I then, you would rightfully ask?

Well… The instantiation process would take to long, and did I say we were under time-pressure?

  • Setup wizard, 5 minutes
  • The famous *-all.sh script, ~ 1 hr.
  • Datapump Export, ~ 10 hrs.
  • Copy from DC old to DC new,  ~ 36 hrs.
  • Datapump Import, ~ 10 hrs.

So, totally we could spend 57:05 hrs. to try to fix this on the go…

Okay, here we go:

Note: cst-migration is the name of the replication project as you specified it in setup wizard when setting up Replication.

TIP: When setting up on-line replication, it is worth your effort to create separate tnsnames.ora entries for your project, like ‘repl-source’ and ‘repl-target’ acros all nodes.
It can get hellishly confusing if you have, as in this case, a database that is called <cst> and is called the same on the source and target server!

1. Step one:
We obviously had the ./cst-migration/config directory from our basic setup with just MINE & APPLY. This directory holds (among others) the ./cst-migration/config/cst-migration-ontime.ddc file. This file holds the Dbvisit Replicate Repository contents that is needed to run the processes.

From this setup, MINE is actually running. We actually concluded the fact that we were not catching up from this process.

2. Step two:
Now we run dbvrep -> setup wizard again and create a Replicate setup directory with FETCHER and isolate the ./cst-migration+fetcher/config/cst-migration+fetcher-onetime.ddc.

By comparing the two files, I was able to note the differences and therewith conclude the changes necessary to introduce a FETCHER process. It is a meticulous job to make sure all the paths on all the three servers are correct, that port numbers are correct and that all the individual steps are take in the right order. This is the overview.

Having these changes, it is all downhill from now.

3. Step three:
Using the Dbvisit Replicate console, the new entries and the changes were made to the DDC-information stored in the Replicate repository. You can enter these manually or execute your change-file by executing @<change-file-name> inside the console.

4. Step four:
Create the ./cst-migration directory on the system you will use for the relocated MINE process and copy the cst-migration-MINE.ddc and cst-migration-run-source-node.sh in this directory.
Rename the cst-migration-run-source-node.sh to cst-migration-run-mine-node.sh to reduce confusion.
Make sure that the paths mentioned in the cst-migration-MINE.ddc are correct for the system you are starting it on!

NOTE: Please make sure that you can reach both the source and the target database from this node using the tnsnames-entries you have created for the replication setup.

5. Step five:
Rename the cst-migration-MINE.ddc on the source node (!) to cst-migration-FETCHER.ddc and change the cst-migration-run-source-node.sh file to start the FETCHER process in stead of MINE process.

You are now ready to start your new replication processes!

NOTE: If you are running APPLY already, there are some additional things you need to be aware of.

Although it was not the case when I came across this challenge, I am happy to say that Dbvisit have verified and accepted this solutions as a supported action.

Hope this helps.

My picks, no, Agenda… for UKOUG_Tech15

I went over the agenda for UKOUG_Tech15 and took my picks & suggestions.
Then I thought, why not share these…

MONDAY

The Oracle Database In-Memory Option: Challenges & Possibilities
Christian Antognini – Trivadis AG

Standard Edition Something for the Enterprise or the Cloud?
Ann Sjökvist – SE – JUST LOVE IT

All about Table Locks: DML, DDL, Foreign Key, Online Operations,…
Franck Pachot – DBi Services

Silent but Deadly : SE Deserves Your Attention
Philippe Fierens – FCP
Co-presenter(s): Jan Karremans – JK-Consult (Having a link here would be silly, right)

Oracle SE – RAC, HA and Standby are Still Available. Even Cloud!
Chris Lawless – Dbvisit

SE DBA’s Life a Bed of Roses?
Ann Sjökvist – SE – JUST LOVE IT

Oracle Standard Edition Round Table
Joel Goodman – Oracle
Co-presenter(s): Ann Sjokvist, Philippe Fierens, Jan Karremans

TUESDAY

Watch out for #RepAttack… all day long!!
And earn your RepAttack badge-ribbon…

Advanced ASH Analytics: ASHmasters
Kyle Hailey – Delphix

Community Keynote – Dominic Giles

Oracle BI Cloud Service – Moving Your Complete BI Platform to the Cloud
Mark Rittman – Rittman Mead

Infiniband for Engineerd Systems
Klaas-Jan Jongsma – VX Company

Oracle Database In-Memory Option – Under the Hood
Maria Colgan – Oracle

Do an Oracle Data Guard Switchover without Your Applications Even Knowing
Marc Fielding – Pythian

Using Oracle NoSQL to Prioritise High Value Customers
James Anthony – RedStack tech

WEDNESDAY

HA for Single Instance Databases without Breaking the Bank
Niall Litchfield – Markit

Database Password Security
Pete Finnigan – PeteFinnigan.com

Connecting Oracle & Hadoop
Tanel Poder – PoderC LLC

Enterprise Use Cases for Internet of Things
Lonneke Dikmans – eProseed
Co-presenter(s): Luc Bors – eProseed

Bad Boys of On-line Replication – Changing Everything
Bjoern Rost – portrix Systems GmbH
Co-presenter(s): Jan Karremans – JK-Consult

RMAN 12c Live : It’s All About Recovery,Recovery,Recovery
René Antúnez – Pythian

Hopefully it will attend you to some interesting session for you!

Kscope15, a celebration of tech…

Kscope15 promised to be a brand new experience in more than one way.

Kscope15LogoAs I start to write this report, I am flying from Düsseldorf airport to Atlanta. It will be the first time flying to the United States with a stopover, and because of Erik van Roon, I came prepared. With just carry-on luggage, I should end up at my final destination, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, together with my ‘stuff’. I am flying Delta Airlines this time, and for an airline that promises just a ‘lunch’ during the 9 hours flight, they do come up with a lot of food…

My colleagues of FOEX have already arrived at the event-venue and are setting up our booth.

On arrival at Fort Lauderdale airport, I am scheduled to meet-up with distinguished product manager for PL/SQL and EBR, Bryn Llewellyn. From there, we would travel to Hallandale Beach to check into our hotels. This plan was only hindered by sheer force of wind shear at Atlanta International, which delayed my flight.

The first day, the Sunday, started off with a boiling walk to the Diplomat hotel. Upon registration I was pleasantly surprised that FOEX had graciously upgraded my conference pass to a full pass, which is cool as I get to attend sessions! And the kind ladies of ODTUG had even attached an ACE Associate ribbon to my name-tag, of which I am kind of proud.

I had so many cool meet-ups and run-ins at Kscope. Just to name a few new friends in no particular order:

Of course I spent most of my time in the APEX and database development tracks. If you look at the momentum that APEX is generating, I think we can safely say that we are making a difference… We can say with confidence: #LetsWreckThisTogether!

The “together” bit was beautifully expressed by Joel Kallman as you could hear a pin drop when Carl Backstrom and Scott Spadafore of the APEX team were remembered…

But still there is a lot of work that has to be done to further spread the word on APEX. I guess I have had at least 4 conversations where I had the opportunity to talk about and explain APEX to people who were still oblivious. That is one of the most rewarding this to do.

Nikki beachThe week passed so quickly and most experiences are becoming great memories very quickly now. The countless meet ups with friend and heroes from the Oracle world, the white party at Nikki Beach and the after party at The Mansion and of course the Oracle content which was dished out with great quality.

Just on more thing… Travelling Über is the best! I have been doing this in San Francisco and used the service here to get back to the airport. Why would you take a taxi with this service around? Because of the way it works, the drivers I have met, have been much more friendly than regular ‘cabbies’. I would recommend this any day.

So, now I am heading home, hanging in the sky somewhere between Fort Lauderdale and Atlanta. Thinking back on Roel’s blog post on his first Kscope… will this have changed my life? Quite possibly, but on the other hand things could not get much more crazy than they have been over the last 6 to 12 months!!

If you are looking to read up on the business side of things, please check out the FOEX blog!

Please also don’t forget to check out the #Kscope15 hash tag on Twitter and remember, when you are at an Oracle conference, also use the #orclconf as additional hash tag. This will help to make it even easier to follow your favorite tech-community on-line!

Using a terminal emulator on Mac

Dumb title for a blog post? No, not really I guess…

ZOC Terminal emulatorI have been using a terminal emulator, basically ever since I got away from the VT100 terminal:

  • ICE.TCP Pro
  • KEAVT
  • Reflection ‘X’

And a few other obscure applications that I cannot even recall anymore.
Currently, and over the last 6 to 8 years, I have been using ZOC.

The background of this story is: In the beginning these were the first DOS PC’s and later some Windows based machines that needed to interface with (in my case) VAX VMS, and later with the other UNIXes.

But why use a terminal emulator on MAC, for crying out loud? I hear you think… OS X is a Unix, so it should be all native, right?
Wrong! Well, kind of…

There are so many small (and bigger) differences when using various systems that it pays off to have a program that allows you to tune into these differences. Nothing more annoying than a backspace key that does not work or key-combinations that act different than you would expect.
This is even more true when you work with a mix of different operating systems, Solaris, HP UX, Oracle Linux, perhaps even some IBM OS’s.
And for when you would like to have further tune-ability of you toolkit, ranging from colors, to sizes, from fonts to layout.  Frivolities? Perhaps, but if you spent a lot of your time everyday in such a  tool, it does make a difference.

Printer terminal, also a terminal emulatorMore importantly are configurable logging, for documentation and troubleshooting. You can regard this as the modern variation to the old school print terminal (who can remember those?)
Configuring transfer types, modem and commutation settings and keeping these organized. As well as password storage and administrative support.

Well, basically, this is why I use a terminal emulator on my MAC!
And I think I found a valid tool in ZOC, by Markus Schmidt. Please check it out ZOC

Well, I hope you get to enjoy your terminal work as much as I do!

Register redo-log manually with Divisit Replicate

For those of you who haven’t been working with on-line data replication; in short, it is a way to copy data from a source database to a target database and do this on-line (both databases are active) and do it near-real-time.
This means that when you enter data in you source database, you can immediately query it from your target database. This makes on-line data replication ideal for numerous tasks, like moving and / or upgrading your database while it is being used, with almost no downtime at all.

This tale is of an actual project that I conducted. I used Dbvisit Replicate as my tool of choice.

dbvisit-replicate-logical-replication-made-easy-18-638Dbvisit Replicate can use a so-called FETCHER process to act as the “long-arm” for the MINE process. Mining extracts the information from the redo-log files, but, in specific situations, this can be too much of an overhead for the source database server. By moving the MINE to a proxy server, this overhead can be significantly reduced.

In some cases it can be useful to manually transfer redo-log files to the mining stage directory of Dbvisit.
I came across this requirement when catching up a lot of redo from a RAC database. In this case, the RAC cluster creates two streams of redo. When starting the replication processes, the first thread is transferred by FETCHER from the source server to the proxy, before the second thread is transferred. This means mining will pause until the second thread successful delivers the first redo-log file of the second thread. The redo-log information from the second stream is necessary to create consistent and chronologically ordered SQL-statements for the target database. In effect, the SCN’s from first redo-log information of the first stream need to line up with the SCN’s of the second redo-log information.

In this case, this meant having to wait a day or more before mining can start. This is why I decided to copy a number of redo-log files from the source server to the proxy server, where the MINE process is running, manually.
After the copy, the files need to be registered with in the dbvrep-repository. Without this information, the MINE process has no knowledge of the files that are present and about what their contents are.

The update is an easy insert statement, but it should be handled with care, as this needs to be quite precise and it needs a bit of specific information about the redo-log files being added.
You can use the following insert statement to register the files:

insert into dbvrp.dbrsmine_redo_log_history
       (
       ddc_id
     , mine_process_name
     , sequence
     , thread
     , resetlogs_id
     , first_scn
     , next_scn
     , online_name
     , arch_name
     , read_count
     , from_fetcher
     , last_mine_start
     , last_mine_end
     , create_date
     , last_change_date
       )
values
       (
       1
     , ‘MINE’
     , 128779 -- sequence number of the copied file;
     , 2 -- assuming you are updating this thread.
     , 804864915 -- the reset-logs id from the redo-log file
     , 199910296688 -- the first scn from the redo-log file
     , 199911476897 -- the next scn from the redo-log file
     , null
     , ‘/u01/app/oracle/some-big-storage/dbvrep-mine/mine-stage/thread_2_seq_128719.1485.804864915’
       -- full path and name of the file
     , 0
     , ‘Y'
     , null
     , null
     , sysdate
     , sysdate
       )
;

And you can get the information you need about the files here:

select lh.sequence#
     , di.resetlogs_id
     , lh.first_change#
     , lh.next_change#
  from v$log_history lh
 inner join v$database_incarnation di
 using (resetlogs_change#)
 where sequence# = 128779
;

After registering the first file for the second thread, in the Replicate-console, you can watch the MINE process kick off. This process will then again halt after the first file of the second stream is processed in parallel with the first file of the first stream.

Schermafbeelding 2015-05-31 om 21.23.11

I kept adding files until the FETCHER process was able to take over, or you could do this until you test-case or PoC is over.

Setting up SQL Instant Client on MAC

In doing more work directly from my Macbook Air, I ran into a situation where native connectivity to an Oracle environment was needed.Connectivity over Oracle Instant Client
From experience I have always been a big fan of the Full Oracle client, just because it comes with a lot of tools and utilities for troubleshooting, which makes the actual experience a bit more pleasant.
Looking & asking around, though, I learned fairly quickly that this client is just not available for Mac OSX… Thanks to Osama Mustafa for confirming.

So, a fact, although quite a number of IT pro’s are working with Mac!

This leaves no other choise than to divert to the Oracle Instant Client 11, which then, indeed, is just an 11g Instant Client (11.2.0.4)!
It would humor me if Oracle were to bring out a 12c Full Client for Mac, as well as an instant client, if someone would so desire.
To have some more tooling around the client, I downloaded all the packages including at least SQL*Plus.

Though the install process is relatively straight forward (download the archives and unzip them in place) getting SQL*Plus to actually run is a somewhat different ballgame!
As usual, when you start a tool, you’re bombarded by messages about unfound dynamic libraries. This set me (very briefly) on a path to place these files where they were expected on my Mac.

In a place like:

/ade/b/2649109290/oracle/sqlplus/lib

for instance, you would need to place a number of these libraries.
This leaves you with the option to populate your system with all these specific libraries, which is of course just fine, but not my choice (think of the mess in ever having to clean up) and especially not when it can be avoided.

A quick search pointed me to this excellent blogpost by Casey Lucas about this exact same issue. With a tool called ‘otool’* applied as suggested, I am now able to run SQL*Plus natively on my Mac without error messages.

* otool – object file displaying tool
If you need it, call it from the command line. It will install this and other development tools on your Mac.

That is nice, but it’s just only over halfway there.

manneke stopt de stekker erin

 

Now I want something where I can just run:
sqlplus <username>@<database>
without intricate connect-strings.

 

 

This leaves one minor “hack”, or rather “edit” required, your .bash_profile needs a bit of a path addition and an environment setting:
alias ll="ls -l"
export TNS_ADMIN=/Applications/instantclient_11_2
export PATH=/Applications/instantclient_11_2:$PATH

Note: the alias was already in there 😉

To top it off, I created a small tnsnames.ora in the directory with the instant client (keeping all related files neatly tucked away together)

xesource =
(DESCRIPTION =
(ADDRESS =
(PROTOCOL = TCP)
(HOST = 192.168.56.66)
(PORT = 1521)
)
(CONNECT_DATA =
(SERVER = DEDICATED)
(SID = xe)
)
)

And voila, goal acquired.

sqlplus usera@xesource
Never specify the password on the command line. Not only will it be shown, it will also be sent (most probably) unencrypted over SQL*Net

OUGN15, The “boat conference” revisited

Jan at shipsport
Reflections on OUGN

Sometimes things in life can change quickly! It is only two years ago that I came to Oslo for the first time to join the Scandinavian Oracle crew on a boat trip to Kiel.
At that time I had never actually participated in this kind of experience and I wasn’t into presenting either. Together with my good friend Philippe Fierens I discovered a whole new world back then. You could have read about these experiences in some blogpost, but this was lost in the move to my own site, sorry!

And this trip couldn’t have been more different though! With three presentations accepted the two days at sea will be a reunion with the friends I made over the last years, as well as a way to contribute to one of the most tight knit tech communities I know. And this will be in a scene that I remember vividly from being a newbie… And this is somewhat strange, believe me

After a quick and pleasant flight I touched down in Oslo, flying from Amsterdam with a decent sized crew of Dutch Oracle enthusiasts, including my good friends Patrick Barel and Alex Nuijten. Waiting in the Oslo airport for Luís Marques, I catches up with Gurcan Orhan, which was a great surprise.
Later that day we found ourselves in the Oslo harbor for the speakers dinner. You can imagine the collective amount of Oracle knowledge packed into that one restaurant!

frits
Enkitek’s Frits Hoogland on Ansible

After a somewhat restless night we arrived, on Thursday morning, at the ship Color Fantasy with the Heli Helskyaho-company, just in time for the keynotes. It was good to see Mark Rittman and James Morle made it on board too. Especially as James was up for the delivery of version 2.0 of his vibrant keynote! Next we proceeded to bring our luggage to our cabins and grab a spot of lunch on the exhibition floor down in the belly of the ship. The setup of the exhibition was quite nice and gave a good opportunity to mix and mingle.
The afternoon was spent on sessions, where I visited Frits Hoogland with the Ansible talk, and preparation for my own session at 18:00. This is the last run of this APEX presentation, as I have retired it after OUGN15. The slides will be archived here.
After finalizing the preparation for the third edition of the Standard Edition Round Table (aka “slide polishing”) with the #orclSERT team, comprising of Ann Sjökvist, Philippe and myself, it was time for the souree and for diner in the grand restaurant on board. It has been a good first day!

Diner
Dinner with the international crew on board the Color Fantasy.
Gin-tonic
Warm reception at Kiel port.

The second day of OUGN15 started with a multitude of sessions including the third edition of the Oracle Standard Edition Round Table, which was actually quite busy and interactive. We had some good discussions, and that at 09:00, so thank you, everybody.
Of course, as was declared a tradition, Björn Rost was present in the Kiel harbor. With the famous “Basil smash Gin & tonic” and sandwiches we were welcomed on German soil.
My afternoon comprised 3 sessions, starting with my own called “Okay, and now my database server crashed…” which was quite nicely received. Next Alex Nuijten on 12c new features for developer, topped off with Tim Gorman who taught us to be CSI people, in finding issues in the database.
After an enjoyable evening in the various bars and discotheques of the ship we retired the official part of the Oracle User Group Norway Vårseminar 2015, thanking the board and of course especial Øyvind Isene, for their hard work.

If you want to catch up further on the unconference communications surrounding this event, please do checkout the Twitter hashtag #OUGN15. This will also include a great set of snapshots and pictures taken along the way…

Oslo, until the next time!

Oracle on OpenVMS – revival

Can it be true?

Will there be Oracle on OpenVMS again? Meaning the “regular” (sorry) Oracle (12c) RDBMS on a revived VMS?

As many who have ever lived on OpenVMS have always known:

OpenVMS will never die!

OpenVMS can never die, becOpenVMSause it is still running way to many hidden, hyper-mission-critical environments.
The fact that these environments are hidden, combined with the fact nobody ever spent any marketing budget on OpenVMS at all, created a super solution nobody knows about. And you cannot love what you don’t know.

A lot has been happening around this tormented operating system. OpenVMS is indefinitely bound to Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) which was acquired by Compaq in June of 1998 and then merged into Hewlett Packard in May 2002.

DIGITAL-logo
Personally I have lost access to OpenVMS, and Oracle op OpenVMS, around 1995, when these systems were replace by HP Unix. I never fully recovered 😉

Until a few years ago I was introduced to a Alpha emulator, which creates a virtual machine with (obviously) an Alpha processor, which allows you to run OpenVMS. This was one step closer (back) to Oracle on OpenVMS.

Recently (like the day before yesterday, recently) I learned a number of new things! One is that the ongoing development OpenVMS will be take up by VMS Software Inc. (VSI).
But, more importantly, they will be creating new versions for mainstream hardware (such as x86)!! Wilm Boerhout of VX Company wrote an announcement about this not too long ago (article in Dutch)!

And now these rumors…

A porting of Oracle on OpenVMS!

Will we once again see the day that systems just won’t go down? Oracle environments with an uptime with like a dozen or two ‘nines’ behind the decimal-mark? Wouldn’t that be something?
Your own VMS server running an Oracle database with Oracle Application Express (APEX)? Wouldn’t that be something else? High time to clear some of your calendar and get (re)acquainted with this super OS!

A very special “thank you” goes to my dear friend Gerrit WoertmanOpenVMS Ambassador, who never seized to remain a link to the VMS World!!

If you are from The Netherlands, please also join Interexperience, to stay close to the game.

Live free or die